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Motivate Your Future

  • Course level: All Levels

About Course

Join Motivate and Develop Your Skills!

Description

This e-learning program aims to increase language teachers and social workers competences of a variety of methodologies such as creative drama, gamification, non formal education to work with adult refugees and immigrants. The program contains also instructions about self assessment tool, networking, validation and language teaching. The course is the output of the project name; MOTIVATE.

What Will I Learn?

  • to increase competences to handle Non-Formal Education
  • to increase motivation of the target group to work with social inclusion
  • to empower the target group with new and creative methods

Topics for this course

45 Lessons10h

Active and Inclusive Learning Environment?

Active and inclusive teaching and learning practices are crucial in creating and maintaining a learning environment in which all participants are fully engaged and respected, and in which all participants are open to ideas, perspectives, and ways of thinking. “An inclusive school or classroom can only be successful when all students feel they are truly part of the school community. This can only happen through open, honest discussion about differences and understanding and respecting people from all abilities and backgrounds. An inclusive environment is one where everyone feels valued.” (VarinderUnlu (2017); https://www.cambridge.org/elt/blog/2017/11/15/create-inclusive-classroom-environment/) When relying on formal learning formats the social interaction usually runs short and this therefore results in poor learning processes or at least in differences in learning within the group. Non-formal learning methods can help to foster engagement by everybody.
Introduction Video2:11
Power Point Slide
Word Document
Supportive Videos12:17
Let’s Play Game
Let us Reflect

Information Communication Technology; Gamification?

Gamification is the use of game-based mechanics, aesthetics and game thinking to engage people, motivate action, promote learning and solve problems. Basically it is the use of gaming technology to solve problems outside of the games sector. Games are created to draw people in, to keep them playing, to keep them interested, entertained and involved. And it’s much more than just adding rewards, points, and badges to processes to motivate people –it’s the instructional method, and not just the delivery system, that provides the elements for learning in a game situation i.e. we must ask what pieces in games makes them engaging such as interactivity, content, story.

Mentoring Schemes and Theories?

Cambridge Dictionary defines mentoring as: “the act or process of helping and giving advice to a younger or less experienced person, especially in a job or at school” or “the activity of supporting and advising someone with less experience to help them develop in their work”. Support, help, give advice are the key words that represent the mentoring concept. However, Mentoring is more than ‘giving advice’, or passing on what your experience was in a particular area or situation. It's about motivating and empowering the other person to identify their own issues and goals, and helping them to find ways of resolving or reaching them - not by doing it for them, or expecting them to ‘do it the way I did it’, but by understanding and respecting different ways of working

Language, Literacy Skills, and Social Behaviour?

“Reading and writing are foundation skills. Not only are they required for further study, they are also crucial in helping us to understand and engage with the world around us. In this sense literacy is highly contextual – what we are required to do with our literacy is always contextualised – situated within a particular socio-cultural setting. Indeed, it has become common to refer to literacies, rather than literacy, to emphasis the point that literacy is a social practice and so there is not one form of literacy that everyone needs. Instead, we all need (and use) different literacies depending on our social or professional group (e.g. nurses, teenagers, academics); the kinds of activities we engage in (e.g. shopping, dealing with bureaucracy, studying etc. ); and the different social and institutional contexts in which we act (school, work, home etc.)” (EPALE - Electronic Platform for Adult Learning in Europe).“Reading and writing are foundation skills. Not only are they required for further study, they are also crucial in helping us to understand and engage with the world around us. In this sense literacy is highly contextual – what we are required to do with our literacy is always contextualised – situated within a particular socio-cultural setting. Indeed, it has become common to refer to literacies, rather than literacy, to emphasise the point that literacy is a social practice and so there is not one form of literacy that everyone needs. Instead, we all need (and use) different literacies depending on our social or professional group (e.g. nurses, teenagers, academics); the kinds of activities we engage in (e.g. shopping, dealing with bureaucracy, studying etc. ); and the different social and institutional contexts in which we act (school, work, home etc.)” (EPALE - Electronic Platform for Adult Learning in Europe).

The Concept of Creative Drama?

According to youthstages.com creative drama is an improvisational, non-exhibitional, process-oriented form of drama, where participants are guided by a leader to imagine, enact, and reflect on experiences real and imagined. Creative drama takes people’s natural world, creative play, and develops it further, using theatre techniques, to create learning experiences which are for the participants. Drama specialist, Brian Way states in Development Through Drama, “Theatre is largely concerned with communication between actors and an audience; Drama is largely concerned with experience by the participants.”

Validation and Recognition of Skills?

The validation and recognition of prior learning, of competences and skills acquired in several life contexts of individual’s life, can contribute to modify the perception people’s have of learning background as a ground of rich knowledge, leading them to understand their life experience as a path to enrich and empower.

Networking / Connecting with Professionals?

A network has an emotional component - The creation and maintenance of a network is linked to the sense of being a responsible contributor in a co-created reality (vgl. P. 9 – 10: Benjamin, J. (2004). Beyond Doer and Done to: An Intersubjective view of Thirdness. Psychoanaltic Quarterly, LXXIII.) - A network builds as well a secure base to reach out even further e.g. to other cultures, religions, groups of people. - A networks is essential in a professional context

The Concept of Self-Assessment?

The ‘self-assessment’ term has been used by many to describe a diverse range of activities, varying from formal to non-formal education methods and used in various educational settings. So, what is self- assessment after all and what does this process include? Where can it be used and what are the benefits of such a tool in adult learning?

The Concept of Non Formal Education?

Non-formal education (NFE / NFL) can cover programmes contributing to adult, youth literacy and education and for children, as well as programmes on life skills (social integration, anti-discrimination, active citizenship), work skills, cultural development.

About the instructor

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2 Courses

42 students

Free

Material Includes

  • 9 videos for explaining the modules
  • 9 document for detailed information about modules
  • 100 Questions for increase the learning and testing your knowledge

Requirements

  • need to complete 50% in order to get certificate
  • need to name and acknowledge Erasmus Plus

Target Audience

  • Social Worker who work with Adult refugees and Immigrants
  • Language teachers who teach in adult education sector
  • Volunteers from NGO who work for integration of Adult refugees and immigrants